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. >> other playoff baseball the tampa bay rays lost to the angels. oakland beat detroit. braves won again and the pirates lost to the brewers. >> come on pirates. >> went 3 for 4, two rbis in my softball game. >> you laid down a couple doubles? >> i hit a couple, no one. >> did they bring out the respirator? >>> let's go to the u.s. open. 296th ranked victoria duval stunned samantha stoeser. it is her first win against a top 20 opponent. her family comes from haiti. her father was actually buried in the rubble in the earthquake three years ago and had to be dug out of the rubble. >> that's an incredible story. >>> more drama from the new york jets camp. the team signed former green bay packers quarterback. he was released after losing out to vince young in green bay for the number two spot. harrell expected to report with the team today. another quarterback joins on the jets roster. rex says he may not make anyone a starter until opening day, day of the game. bring in more quarterbacks. >>> still ahead on "morning joe" governor rick snyder joins us ahead of tomorrow's special show in detr
through her can tame you'd work in her home cap -- continued work in her hometown of detroit. >> i feel so sorry for people not living in detroit. detroit gives a sense of civilization in a way you do not get in a city like new york. obvious what was does not work. striving forways giant, and this is how giants fall. to have youhonored on this program. i am glad you are here. >> i am glad to be here. >> let me ask you what it is about detroit that makes you hopeful. aboute you so optimistic detroit's future? was a picture of the packard motor company. it is now 38 years
beating by the detroit lions. tom brady passes and it's a fumble. detroit snatches the ball close to the five. in the second quarter, brady throws a pick straight to chris houston. lions win, 40-9. yikes. >>> to the ravens and panthers. check out this incredible punt return for the 54-yard touchdown. ted ginn jr. then joe flacco throws, oops, interception, for a touchdown. panthers win, 34-27. >>> you see that shirt rg3 is wearing? it cost him 10 ground. griffin was fined during warm-ups for apparel violation. they are required to wear approved apparel for their respective teams. >>> and in baseball, milwaukee brewers ryan braun released a statement apologizing for using banned substances. he admits taking performance enhancing drugs during his 2011 national league mvp season. >>> on to the rockies and phillies. impressive catch by philadelphia's darryn rush. check out that focus and athleticism. phillies win, 5-4. >>> in pga golf, the barclays tournament, so something you definitely don't get to see every day. scott brown's ball bounces off a bridge and rolls onto the green for a
of compensation, rights, responsibility. not just some. >> you know, lee, in detroit where they just filed bankruptcy, they are actually talking about messing with people's pension. that the autobillionaires companies got bailed out and they're talking about taking workers pensions. and people want to know why we're marching? >> the retirees pensions in detroit average $19,000 a year. yet they want to attack the workers, they want to attack retirees. we've got to say no. we are not going to let that happen. they are using workers as scapegoats. that's one of the reasons we're out here tomorrow and we're going to be here until we're able to fight successfully for workers rights all over this country. it is a shame that folks would go after a retiree who makes $19,000 a year expecting they can sacrifice more. we've got to say no to that, al. all of us. our communities, our coalition partners, labor unions. we've got to say that's unacceptable in the richest country on the face of the earth. >> dennis, the speech we all remember was "i have a dream." but the person who called this march 50 ye
. >>> detroit's animal control officials are denying the claim that 50,000 stray dogs are roaming the streets of the abandoned city. it's the direct result of the city's economic woes as job losses in detroit grow thousands of dogs and other pets were abandoned. >> in 2012 there were 903 bites to humans in the city of detroit. there are 50 calls a day, by citizens asking for relief from the dogs, from the pit bulls that are chasing them, and endangering their children and four is the number of officers i have to cover that. >> that's not your dog? see how this dog looks? this dog is not taken care of. you can tell this dog has been out, he's got fleas all over him he's not groomed well and we pick up dogs like this off the street all the time. when you have an economic decline of a city in an urban area, there are things that are going to suffer. >> there is more coming up on al jazeera. shakespeare never heard about hip hop but hip hop knows all the the bend. coming up next here othello performed in a way the author could never have imagined. and a young man named johnny football will not be
get an old-fashioned beating by the detroit lions. first time tom brady passes and he fumbles. detroit snatches the ball close to the 5. in the second quarter, brady throws a pick straight to chris houston. lions win, 40-9. yikes. to the ravens and panthers. check out this incredible punt return for a 54-yard touchdown. ravens quarterback joe flacco throws. oops, interception for a touchdown. panthers win, 34-27. >>> and you see that shirt rg3 is wearing? well, it's costing him 10 grand. griffin was fined for wearing this during warm-ups for an apparel violation. >> that's an expensive shirt. >> the league requires players to wear approved apparel for their respective teams. >>> and in baseball, milwaukee brewers' ryan braun released a statement apologizing for using banned substances. he admits taking performance-enhancing drugs during his 2011 national league mvp season. >>> and, well, this is truly bizarre, bill cowher, the broadcaster and super bowl winning coach with the pittsburgh steelers is featured in his girlfriend, queen bee's, music video and it appears he's wearing some ey
people may not know his speech originated in part in detroit. explain what dr. king was saying two months before. guest: yes, i'm from detroit and i grew up there. with aretha franklin's father and many other prominent ministers in detroit. dr.king participated in a huge march in detroit leading down near cobal hall where he delivered a similar speech and he talked about using our resources to make sure justice will be delivered. he talked about some of the same things he did in washington. he also talked about obviously detroit being the headquarters of a tremendous labor movement with u.a.w. the local focus in terms of negro rights was extraordinarily powerful. so dr. king founded some of those things but of course took them to a new level in washington. host: from june of 1963 two months before the march on washington. this is put together from motown records. >> i have a dream this afternoon. my four little children will not come up in the same young days that i came up. they will be judged on the basis of the content of their character and not the color of their skin. i have a dre
with civil rights activists through detroit's gross point suburb in 1963. that's 50 years ago. the editorial information on that ap photo notes romney said he had not been asked to head the parade, but added since he was in the detroit area, he decided to come out anyway. in other words, he didn't wait for an invitation. he made sure he was there. in this 1966 reelection -- his 1966 reelection for campaign for michigan governor, romney won 30% of the black vote. one generation later in the same family, mitt romney wins 6% of the african-american vote. by the way, here is a great picture. where i grew up in. jackie robinson and nelson rockefeller. he told reporters he was a rockefeller republican. you had jackie robinson, lionel hampton, all those people, famous people, wilt chamberlin, a lot of people were republicans. today you can't find them. >> a lot of our families were. i can go back in my family, especially my family in north carolina, and there were a lot of republicans. but when the party changed, you know, blacks decide we needed to go to a plays where we were welcome and where we
from detroit would be on an historic black history calendar. >> should we show your sign? >> sure. >> this is from the original march on washington more jobs and freedom, august 28th, 1963. >> this is the banner i proudly held on that day, that's seen in that picture. >> beautiful. >> eugene, you know, part of what was so powerful about that day, and you've written about this, dr. king was able to connect with broader values in terms of jobs, in terms of justice, and sort of economic justice. and it was a message, i think, that resonated beyond just the black community. talk about that a little bit. >> well, you know, people forget. dr. king, not everyone in the civil rights movement believed dr. king's path was the right path. there were just grievances with him and roy wilkins, who was the head of the naacp, for example. stan mentioned bayyup ruston who did such an amazing job of bringing this whole coalition of people together. who talk about all these various issues. and of course, it was a day on which "the washington post," among other newspapers, missed "i have a dream." >>
is starting to produce its plant right outside of detroit. i'm richelle carey, some citizens in pakistan risk their lives pressing for reform. and you can always go to our website, aljazeera.com, for the latest. do keep it here. have a great day. ♪
history moved deeps into yosemite national park. >>> the city of detroit is getting a makeover. the state plans to demolish nearly 4,000 abandoned homes to remove the blithe. >>> and at least 21 people in texas have been sickened from a measles outbreak. that's the headlines "consider this" is up next on al jazeera. ♪ ♪ >>> who is bash aral-assad. the syrian president could be forcing america into another unpopular mideast war. how did a man who trained to be an opthal gist turn into this leader. >>> and a count think clerk takes what he says the current law into his own hands and joins the hands of those who want a marriage certificate regardless of their sexual preference. should one man be able to change the same-sex marriage debate? good evening, i'm antonio mora, and welcome to "consider this." we begin with syria, as the obama administration weighs its options to intervene in syrian's civil war, the white house's repeated calls for bashar al-assad's removal. >> reporter: after two and a half years of turmoil, leaving more than 100,000 people dead, the man ruling syria has earned
that economic justice required political power. in the two months before the march when king spoke in detroit before a crowd of 150,000, he reminded them there in his version of the "i have a dream" speech in detroit that it was time for blacks to have access to housing and jobs. >> let me get you to pause one second as we watch the president and the first lady now desce descending the stairs. this will be followed by the star-spangled banner performance. you see the president there. his remarks are scheduled around 2:44 p.m. eastern time. it is now 2:12 eastern time. you hear the applause there. professor, again, chris made the point about the president needing to address some of these current issues. double-digit unemployment rate for african-americans and to equate it to what we experienced then and sadly the numbers that exist today. >> no, it's a great point. i mean, again, when barack obama was elected president, it was important for many african-americans to see him as a realization of that political power. for many, he realized that vision -- >> let me pause you as we listen to the na
, in chicago, detroit, philadelphia, and all over this nation, the black masses are on the march for jobs and freedom. >> in the five decades since, john lewis has become an icon of the civil rights movement, a hero who faced down brutal southern police in the name of freedom and was beaten bloody for daring to do so. today, he is a 14-term congressman from georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got
for detroit. 20 10 air cargo threat as well as other plots that were effectively mitigated. some more international in scope and origin like the christmas they plot was involved a nigerian citizen who purchased his ticket in ghama,. flew from legos to amsterdam and attended to ignite a bomb en route to america. that attempted attack, we learned that relevant information possessed by u.s. customs and border protection needed to be available overseas at the last point of departure for the united states. we fixed that. we learned that our adversaries were moving to nonmetallic devices. we adapted our screening technology and tactics to counter that. learned that a single vulnerability in any part of the aviation system can make everyone connected to it vulnerable. since we don't control security at foreign airports, we have to work even more closely with international partners to raise the overall security of the system. we did that. shortly after the christmas day plot, i launched a worldwide initiative to make these needed changes in close collaboration with our strongest allies. i am
, responsibility. not just some. >> you know, lee, in detroit where they just filed bankruptcy, they are actually talking about messing with people's pension. that the autobillionaires companies got bailed out and they're talking about taking workers pensions. and people want to know why we're marching? >> the retirees pensions in detroit average $19,000 a year. yet they want to attack the workers, they want to attack retirees. we've got to say no. we are not going to let that happen. they are using workers as scapegoats. that's one of the reasons we're out here tomorrow and we're going to be here until we're able to fight successfully for workers rights all over this country. it is a shame that folks would go after a retiree who makes $19,000 a year expecting they can sacrifice more. we've got to say no to that, al. all of us. our communities, our coalition partners, labor unions. we've got to say that's unacceptable in the richest country on the face of the earth. >> dennis, the speech we all remember was "i have a dream." but the person who called this march 50 years ago was a labor leader nam
in detroit, protecting the pensions of people attacked by a financial manager. they were affected by the changes of what took place in detroit. they've been spending a lot of time trying to straighten that out. >> a reminder 50 years ago this was a march for jobs and freedom, organized largely by a. phillip randolph, the great labor leader and the issue of union rights, labor rights, workers rights has always been deeply interconnected with civil rights in this country. >> there's no question about it. the unions are a little nervous as this continuing attack on collective bargaining, continual attack and the introduction of legislation in right to work states, this is being introduced. local elections are taking ahold and attacking workers and depressing wages. this is a big part of what afsme has been focusing on. they're at the pinnacle of the fight right now of what's going on in michigan. >> it's almost impossible to imagine how we can talk about closing a racial inequality gap without also talking at the exact same time about the economic equality that is so critical in our
to come and build homes and get a stake in the american dream. i actually think, you know, detroit, which has this massive excess supply in housing and not a lot of people who want to live there, if those were marketed immigrants, if the exchange was you can be legal, but you have to live in detroit, that might actually help that state a great deal. but i'm not sure about pairing those two together. >> dan, i've got -- i have a pet peeve here. the president is only half the equation when it comes to helping the economy and doing things to move this country forward. so where's congress in all of this? we hear the president going around the country giving speeches, but i'm just hearing crickets from congress. >> certainly on housing, you know, you'll hear some republicans. bob corker talks a lot about the reform. not a lot of proposals from the house congressional caucus on how to help people refinance. there's a strange kind of ideological, political thing going on here, which is a red state, blue state thing. fannie mae and freddie mac provide mortgage financing. the goal is to have them
'donnell. would rain put a damper on the a's it detroit? and get your tape measures out. this was big in dinver. wait until you see -- in denver. wait until you see it coming up. ,, ,,,,,,,,,,,, unbelievable. shhhhh! in our day, we didn't have u-verse high speed internet. yeah, our babysitter didn't have a million ways to serve mom up on a silver platter. we had to count sheep to fall asleep. and i always worried that i was creating an overcrowded sheep farm. in my head... never looked like that farmer took proper care of those sheep. too much? a little. [ male announcer ] connect all your wi-fi-enabled devices with u-verse high speed internet. and got an unexpected visita 350 pound blue marlin that t >>> a close call in the dominican republic where fishermen hooked a 350-pound blue marlin that leaped on the boat nearly spearing a crew member. they usually release the marlins but because this died on board the crew gave it to a local fisherman. >> that was a close call, though. >> wow. >>> good morning, everybody. justin verlander beat the a's twice in the play-offs last year. well, last night
on washington. first, edith lee payne of detroit tells the story of one of the iconic pictures taken at the event. >> one evening in october of 2008, i got a phoneical from my cousin, marcia, who lives in baltimore mo, maryland, she had been browgz a category with some friend and came across a 2009 black history calendar. on the front of this calendar were pictures of dr. king, and frederic douglas, jesse owens. and on the back of the calendar were these same people but, also, there was a picture of me. i of course immediately recalled being at the march on washington but i didn't recall a picture being taken. it also happened to be my 12th birthday. that day in washington was a very hot day. but it was a day where a lot of people from all over the country came together for a common goal, and that was to make the quality of life better for everyone. it was very special to me to be there, to be one of the people present to make a difference in what dr. king had brought to our attention. >> woodruff: that was edith lee payne of detroit. you can find her story, and other firsthand accou
. >> reporter: when ralph mandarino goes to the grosse point public library outside of detroit it's not always for a book. >> i have a tool that's on reserve. >> reporter: that's right. tool, a tree trimmer. he says it's a better tool than owning one. if i bought that how often would you use it. >> that's the point. you'd only use it maybe once a year. >> reporter: here at the grosse point library there are 285 tools to borrow, everything from "a" on adjustable wrench to "x" an xacto knife. they're still looking for "y" and "z." libraries aren't just for books anymore. dvds are common on library shelves but the skokie, illinois, library, has things to make digital videos, flip cams, laptops and small video cameras. >> so i can put it on my head. >> reporter: that you can wear. >> we have people using a go pro camera for extreme stuff. >> reporter: librarians say it's all about meeting the needs of their communities in a world that's shifting from the printed world to digital content. in ann arbor, michigan, it means offering things that can't be downloaded, like telescopes and steel drums. ♪
history moved deeper into the yosemite national park. >>> the city of detroit getting a makeover. the state plans to demolish nearly 4,000 abandoned homes to remove urban blight. >>> and health officials in texas working to contain a measles outbreak linked to a so-called mega church. i'm john siegenthaler. mer "america tonight" is next. >>> what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >> they share it. >> social media isn't an afterthought. america. >> al-jazeera social america community online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations >> post, upload and interact. >> every night, share undiscovered stories. >> the stream, tomorrow night, [[voiceover]] every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. would probably be very good at that also. that is it for al-jazeera america. >>> and welcome b
're seeing the kinds of policies in philadelphia, detroit, and chicago, that are gutting those urban areas, and at the end of king's life, he was talking about what was happening in urban areas like chicago, so i think he would be asking us to turn our attention back to those places, and figure out how to create life chances for folks come that is sustainable. >> brittany don says we have to teach more than the sanitized civil rights. how do we connect it to the king? >> i think she is absolutely right. in 68 when king got killed there was a more robust movement that was talking about capitalism, i had a friend email me to say that when she went to the march this weekend there was not a lot of accessibility for folks in wheelchairs. >> sierra dream defenders uses traditional situations to get your point across. you staged a month-long sit-in in florida for the governor's office. do you think following dr. king's for-september for-septembers -- for-cept are still the way to go? >> absolutely. things haven't changed. we haven't really won on the issues, and i think that's because, you know,
is focusing on detroit. a city that is gone through incredible pain. and this is an opportunity for those of us who believe this is the greatest country in the world for people to have the opportunity to become all that they can be. we can go to detroit and it's a city where we which party has run that city for the past 50 years and we can propose different solutions, solutions . sed on our free enterprise strongly encouraging enterprise zones in detroit but we need ideas. anyone want to talk to us about detroit, that's where we think is one of the most important places to have an impact and to share in the cause that each of us believe. it's an honor to be with you all to share some words. i appreciate the opportunity. and god bless you. god bless america. thank you. >> thank you. now we will hear from mr. bob woodson sr., founder and president for the center of america.integrated >> good afternoon. the dr. king i remember was a man who was not content with reflecting the majority opinion or the consensus of the majority but he challenged it. we forget that the civil rights movement was
desk. >> reporter: when ralph mandarino goes to the grosse public library outside of detroit it's not always for a book. >> i have a tool on dereserve. >> reporter: that's right a tool, a tree trimmer. he says it's a better dotool th owning him. if you bought that how many times would you use it. >> that's point, only once a year. >> reporter: everything from an adjustable wrench to "x" an exacto knife. they're still looking for y and z. libraries aren't just for books anymore. dvds are common on library shelves but the skokie, illinois, library, has things to make digital video, flip cams, laptops and small video cameras. >> so i can put it on my head. >> reporter: that you can wear. >> we have people using a go pro camera for extreme stuff. >> reporter: librarians say it's shifting from a world of print to digital content, offering things that can't be downloaded like telescopes and steel drums. kids are drawn to the musical tools like electronic synthesizers. some chicago public libraries offer a quieter attraction for kids, fishing poles. at the sherman park branch on the ci
on dietrich. -- detroit. through -- has gone and an opportunity for those of us who believe this is still the greatest country in the world for people to have the opportunity to become all that they can be. we can go to detroit and it is a city where we go the window which party has run that city for the past 50 years. and with can propose a different solutions that are based on our free enterprise system. we are busy encouraging enterprise to be strongly considered in detroit. we need ideas. if any by was to talk about detroit, that is where we think is one the most important places to have an impact and share in cause that calls -- each of us believe. i appreciate the opportunity and god bless you and america. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, jimmy. now we hear room -- we will hear from mr. wilson. thank you. [applause] >> good afternoon. rememberedg that i was a man who was not content with reflecting majority opinion by the consensus of the majority but he challenged it. we forget that the civil rights movement was not monolithic that we had great conflict in -- and challenge withi
detroit and birmingham county. those are not priorities. >> what should the white house do. what would dr. king say to barack obama today? >> he would be delighted that we have in him, president obama, the crown jewel of our struggle. he that done an incredible job making the case for a better nation. on the other hand, president obama would be in the asks i say, in the johnson lincoln lane, dr. king in the douglas lane appealing to the president. i think they need president obama to deem with the lyndon johnson moment. he gave us solid analysis, and appropriation and legislation. we need now, 30% black unemployment, we need appropriation and legislation to close these tremendous gaps. >> reverend jackson, we go back many years, thanks for being with us this morning. >> thank you, sir. >> i hope you enjoy your day down on the mall. >> indeed. >> coverage continues today on aljazeera and aljazeera.com. we will have special coverage from the lincoln memorial at 2:00 eastern time. >> we turn now to the weather situation across the country, where they are wondering what it is going to be like
for detroit and made sure that we saved the car manufacturers and all the jobs that went with it. i think he would also be questioning about why there aren't more people from wall street who have gone to jail at this time. but i think he would be very proud, and perhaps have some questions as well. >> ben jealous, thank you, as always. we appreciate it. >>> ahead on "newsroom," as the u.s. considers military intervention in syria, our security analysts with a lot of experience in troubled spots calls this the problem from hell for the united states. we'll be talking to peter bergen up ahead. with new phillips' fiber good gummies. they're fruity delicious! just two gummies have 4 grams of fiber! to help support regularity! i want some... [ woman ] hop on over! [ marge ] fiber the fun way, from phillips'. >>> crisis in syria has increasingly become a u.s. problem. it is a big problem. our national security analyst peter bergen summed up some of the issues in an op-ed on our website cnn.com. he writes here, i'm quoting, "whoever ultimately prevails in this fight is hardly going to be an ally of
, he did one in 1960 to '61. another in detroit. so he put them all together to deliver this incredible message that moved the nation and our world. >> that crescendo that came at the end, that build, the speech was kind of prosaic, then he started talking my country 'tis of thee from the song. and the references to the bible and shakespeare. "the new york times" today pointed out -- people are going to be studying this for years. the source material of the bible, of shakespeare, of woody guthrie, of the declaration and documents all enriching that one statement. in 17 minutes. >> i mean, that's the brilliance of it. that was the brilliance of who he as an orator was. and "i have a dream" is probably one of the most well-known speeches on the planet. >> around the world. >> around the world. unquestionably. and i think certainly today represented some of that. with all the coverage from rural networks. i've done so many things from bbc that i've ever done in my life. but because of the importance of this message. >> what's it like when you hear him say on tape again my four little child
it in ohio, detroit, pennsylvania. >> they're doing it in texas. >> it would create jobs. so many opportunities for all americans. there is your answer. >> i want to add one point. i lived in atlanta. the day i arrived in atlanta, my first day on the air i got a call from maynar, d jackson. i got to know andrew young, josea williams. martin luther king's driver. i got to know these guys. what they did many the face of such hostility is an amazing profile in courage. what they did made this country better. >> absolutely. >> the president gave a good speech today, bob. one of the best speeches i have heard him give. >> talk about entitlements. unfortunately president obama has only expanded entitlements to make whites, blacks, hispanics more dependent. it's not helping anybody. you and i know more could be done in washington, d.c. it's cultural. when you have a president who is -- i know you don't like him. i don't like what he does. h's a good father, appearingly a good husband. there are no sex scandals. he's there for his kids. his pants are pulled up. he speaks gramattic -- corr
elements. if you look at his speeches from birmingham, wrik wrigly field, cleveland, chicago, detroit, i have a dream and the march on washington is really a culminationef a series of interracial fest valz that summer in which all the elements, many from letters from a birmingham jail-- are reshuffled. when you see the continuities of "i have a dream" even the drea dream-- and king always believed before there was an american dream-- he used to preach this all the time it's slaves had their own dreams. and keep in mind here, doesn't end with the declaration. it's a black man. black slaefs have the last word when he has whites become blacks so we can all experience bondage and deliverance. always conflicted when you look at king's brilliant mixing to miss these other strains of black pride and rebeaut of america. one day, the national will live out, not now. >> rose: clawrns, how did he end up being the last speaker? >> there was a proposal, 10 speers, and each speaker would be allocated five minute. and the proposal was dr. king would be in the middle, that he would be like the fifth or
in new york this morning and spread across to cities like chicago, charlotte north carolina, and detroit. workers say they want to earn $15 an hour, nearly double the current minimum wage. lois is the history professor at cornell university, and she joins us now from ihnica new york. can you hear me now. >> obviously we are having a little difficult with our life feed there. question will try to come back to them later. the justice department says it will not sue the state's of colorado and washington to block them from legalized recreational marijuana use. instead, the government outlines its priorities for enforcing the laws including keeping pot out of the hands of minors and keeping the drug cart tells out. this leaves many trying to figure out how to make money off this newly legal industry. in abatement room, he gives us a small whiff of the future of big weed. >> we won some awards for this, if you smell it you will get -- blueberry cheesecake. >> this is a 500 square feet growing room, but his company is permitted for nearly 20 times that. we help provide over 10,000 patients wit
detroit worked and experience all of its own. but there's been a marriage between the civil rights movement and the social justice movement for a long time. and as we come to this 50th anniversary, i can recall watching mr. randolph, and certainly dr. king, in that sort of electrifying speech that was given that day, and i want to go back something myrlie said earlier, and that is the movement, i mean the media has really played with our mind for a long time. you know, the most exciting part of dr. king's speech and when te that gave folks so much energy was when he talked about his dream, both for himself, his people and the nation as a whole. but dr. king said some stuff before he got to that part of the speech. that you very seldom hear folks talk about. he was just talking about we came to washington, d.c. you know, which was in a sense of promissory note written by the founders of the nation that spoke to the fact that we were entitled to some stuff. life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness. and when i heard the speech, i was a young leader, a local unit of about 5000 folks. i
of detroit in the throws of bankruptcy and countless other cities teetering on the brink, there is a fierce urgency to act now. if the big auto makers and major financial institutions were too big and too important to fail, why is not the same true of the major urban centers which are populated by millions of poor blacks and brown and white hungering for nothing more than a decent job to provide for themselves and their families? why shouldn't historically black colleges and universities desperate for stability be given the assistance which will enable them to continue their noble mission of educating both the best, brightest, as well as the least of these? as we struggle to recover from the worst economic calamity since the great depression, america needs a new marshall plan for our cities to provide jobs, infrastructure improvements, and a true lasting stimulus to the economy. while we are inspired today by the majesty of power of my father's exhortation of yesterday year we must be mindful of this imperative of love. he sought the beloved community where we could live together with peace
't have to look any more at greece and portugal. we can look close by at detroit . folks, that is a picture of where liberal progressive ideas go. detroit was america's premier city. highest per capita income in the country. proud of our country and the auto business there. but then as you had government unions grow and higher taxes, and more regulation, as you saw these liberal progressive ideas that were supposed to help the poor and build a middle class, what have we been left with in detroit? for minorities and the poor? unemployment, about 40%. has it helped children get a better education? only 7% of children in the eighth grade read at the grade level. has it created the prosperity that they talk about when a third of the buildings are empty, where you've got 400ly quor stores and until a few weeks ago not one chain super market in what was america's premier city. folks, it's not a theatrical argument any more. and the states of california and illinois and other states following that policy are not far behind in some form of bankruptcy. our ideas are being show cas
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